Brains: How They Seem to Work

Brains How They Seem to Work For years the world s most brilliant neuroscientists have struggled to understand how human brains really work Today says Dale Purves the dominant research agenda may have taken us as far as it
  • Title: Brains: How They Seem to Work
  • Author: Dale Purves
  • ISBN: 9780137055098
  • Page: 129
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Brains: How They Seem to Work
    For 50 years, the world s most brilliant neuroscientists have struggled to understand how human brains really work Today, says Dale Purves, the dominant research agenda may have taken us as far as it can and neuroscientists may be approaching a paradigm shift In this highly personal book, Purves reveals how we got to this point and offers his notion of where neurosciencFor 50 years, the world s most brilliant neuroscientists have struggled to understand how human brains really work Today, says Dale Purves, the dominant research agenda may have taken us as far as it can and neuroscientists may be approaching a paradigm shift In this highly personal book, Purves reveals how we got to this point and offers his notion of where neuroscience may be headed next Purves guides you through a half century of the most influential ideas in neuroscience and introduces the extraordinary scientists and physicians who created and tested them Purves offers a critical assessment of the paths that neuroscience research has taken, their successes and their limitations, and then introduces an alternative approach for thinking about brains Building on new research on visual perception, he shows why common ideas about brain networks can t be right and uncovers the factors that determine our subjective experience The resulting insights offer a deeper understanding of what it means to be human Why we need a better conception of what brains are trying to do and how they do it Approaches to understanding the brain over the past several decades may be at an impasse The surprising lessons that can be learned from what we see How complex neural processes owe to trial and error experience than to logical principles Brains and the people who think about them Meet some of the extraordinary individuals who ve shaped neuroscience The ghost in the machine problem The ideas presented further undermine the concept of free will
    Brains: How They Seem to Work By Dale Purves,
    • READ AUDIOBOOK ✓ Brains: How They Seem to Work - by Dale Purves
      129 Dale Purves
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      Published :2020-03-06T04:20:43+00:00

    About " Dale Purves "

  • Dale Purves

    Dale Purves born March 11, 1938 is Geller Professor of Neurobiology Emeritus in the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences where he remains Research Professor with additional appointments in the department of Psychology and Brain Sciences, and the department of Philosophy at Duke University He earned a B.A from Yale University in 1960 and an M.D from Harvard Medical School in 1964.

  • 622 Comments

  • This book is part biography, part history of neuroscience, and part brain theory The author, Dale Purves, was a participant in some of the essential movements in current brain science, and worked with, or otherwise knew, many of the leading figures of contemporary brain science His accounts of the work and personalities of these people are vivid and insightful.In the later parts of the book, he advances a theoretical approach to perception that explains perceptual phenomena such as illusions as [...]


  • Misleading title I haven t rushed into buying this book at all After I was attracted by the title I took a look into the TOC and read a part of the first chapter and skimmed through the rest If you are a person in the neuroscience field then you will definitely enjoy this book, but might not find it greatly useful though The first part of the book is the author s personal journey in the field, the people he enteracted or worked with and the main events that took place in the neuroscience field T [...]


  • I received this on the free books list at Kindle, and as a neuropsychologist I think I paid too much I read through this on the plane to Greece, and most of it reads like an introductory to psych text it dropped some big names, talked about neurons, and discussed sensation and perception , but with personal pictures It was needlessly complex to read in areas, I thought If you have a sudden desire to know how brains work, skip this author s explanation.


  • This book was free when I downloaded it to my Nook from Barnes and Noble I have a general interest in neuroscience For the first six chapters, this book was an entertaining memoir of Purves career and other scientists exploring the function and anatomy of nerve cells and brain cells Then he switches his outlook to an empirical study of vision and perception This part seemed difficult to read and even boring Accordingly our perceptions never correspond to physical reality despite the fact that h [...]


  • The author is gentle in guiding us to understand his point about the need to reconceptualize how brain works, through progressively complex examples Overall, pretty easy to read for an informative book outside my general field of interests, though some passages sentences are unavoidably dense The enjoyable personal historical parts of the book also helped in giving me some breather in between the denser, slower going explanatory sections Left me with questions than answers as any good books in [...]


  • This book describes the history of research into the processing of vision in the human brain The author makes a very good case for the evolutionary development of visual perceptions as they relate to survivabilty The reasoning is compelling Diagrams are included The research is far from finished, but the progress as of 2010 is explained very clearly The associated Web site has graphics with animation that are very helpful to understanding the concepts being presented I enjoyed this scientific wo [...]


  • This book is autobiography first and neuroscience second There are several chapters describing experiments undertaken to support his hypothesis about the empirical nature of how the brain works that are fundamental to his argument Yet I found them tedious I was interested in the implications which are profound But he gives us only the tiniest bit of thinking about those implications The best thing about the book was that it informed me sufficiently to make me hungry for on the topic.


  • DNF 20%Unsuitable for general reading The writing is very jargon y and technical Further, it struck me as egotistical that the author couldn t seem to stop talking about himself and his august alma mater, Haaahvahd Perhaps this book should have been marketed as a scientific memoir instead Kindle freebie


  • Overall, the book provides some indications of Purves personal research interests and some overview of major developments in the field of neuroscience, but the focus of the book is Purves own career and his relationships with his colleagues, not on brains.


  • I found this to be an autobiography of Purves rather than specifically on how brains work However, it was still an interesting book on neuropsychology and I did learn a few new things.


  • i m interested in the science of the brain and was hoping for some new insights, but this book was just so, so dull in its delivery, I struggled to get through it.


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