Couch Fiction: A Graphic Tale of Psychotherapy

Couch Fiction A Graphic Tale of Psychotherapy Ever wanted an insight into counseling Or wished you could be a fly on the wall in a psychotherapy session Couch Fiction allows you to peep through the key hole of the therapy room door and than that
  • Title: Couch Fiction: A Graphic Tale of Psychotherapy
  • Author: Philippa Perry Junko Graat
  • ISBN: 9780230252035
  • Page: 318
  • Format: Paperback
  • Couch Fiction: A Graphic Tale of Psychotherapy
    Ever wanted an insight into counseling Or wished you could be a fly on the wall in a psychotherapy session Couch Fiction allows you to peep through the key hole of the therapy room door and, than that, read the minds of the protagonistsBased on a case study of Pat our sandal wearing, cat loving psychotherapist and her new client, James an ambitious barristerEver wanted an insight into counseling Or wished you could be a fly on the wall in a psychotherapy session Couch Fiction allows you to peep through the key hole of the therapy room door and, than that, read the minds of the protagonistsBased on a case study of Pat our sandal wearing, cat loving psychotherapist and her new client, James an ambitious barrister with a potentially harmful habit he can t stop , this graphic novel follows the anxieties, frustrations, mind wanderings and break throughs of each, through a year of therapy sessions together Beautifully illustrated and accompanied by succinct and illuminating footnotes, this book offers a witty and thought provoking exploration of the therapeutic journey, considering a range of skills, insights and techniques along the way.
    Couch Fiction: A Graphic Tale of Psychotherapy By Philippa Perry Junko Graat,
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    About " Philippa Perry Junko Graat "

  • Philippa Perry Junko Graat

    Philippa Perry, author of How to Stay Sane, is a psychotherapist and writer who has written pieces for The Guardian, The Observer, Time Out, and Healthy Living magazine and has a column in Psychologies Magazine In 2010, she wrote the graphic novel Couch Fiction, in an attempt to demystify psychotherapy She lives in London and Sussex with her husband, the artist Grayson Perry, and enjoys gardening, cooking, parties, walking, tweeting, and watching tellycmillan author philip

  • 824 Comments

  • Couch Fiction is Philippa Perry s creative attempt to show, via the medium of the graphic novel, what the practice of therapy is really about, and that success in therapy depends on the quality of the relationship between the client and the therapist She wrote this book because she wanted to describe what life can be like as a therapist and as a client The author presents a fictional case study of Pat, a messy, middle aged female psychotherapist and James, a seemingly successful, smug, thirtysom [...]


  • Psychotherapy gives me the creeps But wait a moment why did I say CREEPS Was it because I was going to write that it gives me the WILLIES but I didn t want to write the word WILLY because I don t want to draw attention to my WILLY which as you see I have now done How rancidly ironic I see I have subverted myself again.You can t win with psychotherapists But wait who said there was anything to win is that how I look at life As an eternal struggle of winning and losing Aaargh.I prefer Motown to ps [...]


  • If you start this book you ll finish it quickly because once you re granted fly on the wall access to an uber realistic psychotherapy session it s not something you tend to walk away from in a hurry I was engaged, entertained and left feeling like I learned a thing or two, Couch Fiction was well worth the read A graphic novel that explores the months long encounter between London psychotherapist Pat and her client patient co lead James, a successful barrister with an unhealthy compulsive addicti [...]


  • Who would think that a graphic novel read here comic book about psychotherapy would be a good idea Wellum, actually Since it combines two of my interests psychology and comics , I thought, what the heck and took the plunge Plus, it was recommended by one of my colleagues The novel focuses on the psychoanalysis of James Clarkson Smith and shows his progress from scared new client to healthy individual, with all of the ups and downs of therapy interposed Dr Patricia Phillips practices psychoanalyt [...]


  • This is worth reading for the curiosity value alone This comic follows a therapist client relationship from the first visit to the final session Every session is not presented in detail, but the intent is to demystify the process of analysis by showing it from start to finish There are somewhat extensive footnotes for almost every page that point out nuances that may otherwise be missed One has the choice of reading the story, and then going back for the footnotes, or reading page footnotes page [...]


  • The book is a graphic depiction of a psychotherapy case of a man James who is a successful barrister who begins to steal for no reason His kleptomania is explored by his therapist Pat Revelations occur and James is cured I read this thinking it would be an interesting comic and, as a comics fan of both popular and indie varieties, gave this a try Unfortunately it s not very interesting or well drawn First off, the characters never seem real but just cyphers for the author to put into situations [...]


  • Couch Fiction, a graphic tale of psychotherapy was as entertaining as it was informative Perry has put together an insightful snapshot into what it is like to be a therapist and also what it is like to be a patient As a therapist I appreciated the explanatory texts underneath the graphics despite it often being information I knew, the reminder and the explanations helped me identify fresh perspectives Lines like she is not a perfect therapist and there is not such thing are helpful reminders See [...]




  • Written by Philippa Perry and illustrated by Junko Graat, Couch Fiction is an innovative new graphic novel that aims to give readers an insight into psychotherapy by offering both the therapist s and the client s prospective of the therapy process Although none of the characters in Couch Fiction actually exist, in a note to the reader at the beginning of the book Philippa Perry comments that she has taken content from real people s actual dreams for use in the story and that the relationship bet [...]



  • This was a very interesting book, if a bit slight I also think it could have used with one proofread of the copy.


  • I enjoyed this book as a practising counsellor, much of both the theory and the process felt familiar the therapist is written such that she makes human errors, and seeks to correct them when she notices them I assume that the author s source material for the client s inner voice comes partly from her own experience of counselling it s unusual to see both parties thoughts given in an account like this, as the focus is usually on the role held by the author The client s journey felt very real, wh [...]


  • erm this was okay but I was expecting better, the client and counsellor scenario and the counsellors ideas felt abit to simplistic in the message that we talk and thus everything falls into place with a happily ever after and we never again have that same problem it doesnt so much acknowledge the fluency of the change and the chance that the presenting issues may come back and there is not always a permanent cure but rather a continous battle where we may have off days Having said that I did lik [...]


  • Having previously read Susie Orbach s The Impossibility of sex years ago when I was working in psychiatry psychotherapy I was really keen to read this after an interview I read about the author She is married to Grayson Perry the artist who likes to dress up in his female alter ego did some amazing vases that won the Turner prize few yrs ago Loved all the explanations of the psychotherapy terms in simple fun language Great cartoon drawings too A fun afternoon read Will pass on I think Julie migh [...]


  • This was an interesting read It works both on the level of the narrative of a man s therapeutic intervention and on the level of describing the process of therapy from a clinical perspective Interesting ideas that I hadn t considered before I think the narrative element alone is not quite enough to make a whole book, but together they work I want to recommend this to my friend who is about to start a counseling psychology program.


  • I utterly loved this book , and if I am to recommend only one book this year, this would be it The book makes the topic of psychotherapy approachable a topic I ve always been interested in, but haven t been able to find a sensible starting point This may be that starting point I recommend reading just the picture story initially, disregarding all the sub notes, and then re reading with the notes.


  • An interesting take on the specifics of therapy, with annotations and human mistakes from the therapist It s kind of a simplification, though, and it s very specifically analysis Jungian, I think , so it s got the bias that a lot of psychology therapy books have, where their particular take on things really does almost magically solve all the problems.


  • Excellent book Easy to read and understand and really gets over the process of psychotherapy by showing what the therapist and patient are thinking during their sessions I m not a massive fan of graphic format, but it really works here.


  • Very quick read, and good for anyone curious about psychotherapy The book is funny and witty but also complex, providing footnotes that explain the methods the psychotherapist is using on her patient It s educational than narrative, although the story is interesting as well.


  • If you ve ever wondered exactly what happens in a therapy session, this book will answer that question pretty thoroughly As a casual fan of psychology, I found this graphic novel illuminating For fans of Alison Bechdel s Are You My Mother.



  • Very enlightening and entertaining d applicable to one s life read through first without commentary, then re read with, as the graphic novel portion is an easy read.



  • The footnotes were a bit of a distraction at first, but worthwhile, and less of an intrusion as the narrative gained momentum.




  • It s like one big insider joke for psychology grad students Love love love it Excerpts will make it into all future graduate classes I teach




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