Gauguin's Intimate Journals

Gauguin s Intimate Journals These journals are an illuminating self portrait of a unique personality They bring sharply into focus for me his goodness his humor his insurgent spirit his clarity of vision his inordinate hatre
  • Title: Gauguin's Intimate Journals
  • Author: Paul Gauguin
  • ISBN: 9780486294414
  • Page: 323
  • Format: Paperback
  • Gauguin's Intimate Journals
    These journals are an illuminating self portrait of a unique personality They bring sharply into focus for me his goodness, his humor, his insurgent spirit, his clarity of vision, his inordinate hatred of hypocrisy and sham Emil Gauguin, the artist s son, in the Preface.One of the great innovative figures in modern art, Gauguin was a complex, driven individual who, i These journals are an illuminating self portrait of a unique personality They bring sharply into focus for me his goodness, his humor, his insurgent spirit, his clarity of vision, his inordinate hatred of hypocrisy and sham Emil Gauguin, the artist s son, in the Preface.One of the great innovative figures in modern art, Gauguin was a complex, driven individual who, in 1883, gave up his job as a stockbroker in order to be free to paint every day As time passed, he determined to sacrifice everything for his artistic vocation Finally, in pursuit of a place to paint natural men and women living lives unstained by the sham and hypocrisy of civilization, he took up residence in the South Seas, first in Tahiti and, later, in the Marquesas Islands.Completed during the artist s final sojourn in the Marquesas, these revealing journals reprinted from rare limited edition throw much light on the painter s inner life and his thoughts about a great many topics We learn of Gauguin s first stay in Paris in 1876, and his initial encounter with Impressionism, his tumultuous relationship with van Gogh when they lived and painted together in Arles, his pithy evaluations of Degas, C zanne, Manet, and other artists his opinion of art dealers and critics poor , and much Also here are illuminating glimpses of Gauguin s life in the islands his delight in the simple, carefree lives of the natives and the physical charms of Polynesian women, counterbalanced by his struggles with poverty, hatred of the missionaries, and despair over the failures of French colonial justice.Witty, wide ranging, and aphoristic, these writings are not only entertaining in themselves, they are crucial for anyone seeking to understand Gauguin and his work The text is enhanced with 27 full page illustrations by Gauguin.
    Gauguin's Intimate Journals By Paul Gauguin,
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    About " Paul Gauguin "

  • Paul Gauguin

    Gauguin was a financially successful stockbroker and self taught amateur artist when he began collecting works by the impressionists in the 1870s Inspired by their example, he took up the study of painting under Camille Pissarro Pissarro and Edgar Degas arranged for him to show his early painting efforts in the fourth impressionist exhibition in 1879 as well as the annual impressionist exhibitions held through 1882 In 1882, after a stock market crash and recession rendered him unemployed and broke, Gauguin decided to abandon the business world to pursue life as an artist full time.In 1886, Gauguin went to Pont Aven in Brittany, a rugged land of fervently religious people far from the urban sophistication of Paris There he forged a new style He was at the center of a group of avant garde artists who dedicated themselves to synth tisme, ordering and simplifying sensory data to its fundamentals Gauguin s greatest innovation was his use of color, which he employed not for its ability to mimic nature but for its emotive qualities He applied it in broad flat areas outlined with dark paint, which tended to flatten space and abstract form This flattening of space and symbolic use of color would be important influences on early twentieth century artists.In Brittany, Gauguin had hoped to tap the expressive potential he believed rested in a rural, even primitive culture Over the next several years he traveled often between Paris and Brittany, spending time also in Panama and Martinique In 1891 his rejection of European urban values led him to Tahiti, where he expected to find an unspoiled culture, exotic and sensual Instead, he was confronted with a world already transformed by western missionaries and colonial rule In large measure, Gauguin had to invent the world he sought, not only in paintings but with woodcarvings, graphics, and written works As he struggled with ways to express the questions of life and death, knowledge and evil that preoccupied him, he interwove the images and mythology of island life with those of the west and other cultures After a trip to France 1893 to 1895 , Gauguin returned to spend his remaining years, marred by illness and depression, in the South Seas.

  • 455 Comments

  • Van Gogh un g nl klerinden okudu umuz ikilinin ili kisini, kulak kesme olay n di er taraftan nas l oldu unu g rmek a s ndan k ymetli g nl k Zaman n sanat d nyas na, ressamlara, felsefecilere dair Gauguin in d ncelerini de yazd klar ndan renebiliyoruz Ayn zamanda Gauguin in iyi bir edebiyat olabilece ini fark ettiriyor g nl k.


  • Si bien nos advierte que justamente no es un libro , su escritura divaga mucho y no tiene coherencia alguna Me gustaron los comentarios sobre otros pintores como Van Gogh, Manet, Cezanne o Degas, pero son un 5% de la totalidad del libro.


  • I admit it I got a bit impatient with this The man may have had artistic genius, but his writing is all over the place But then he repeatedly tells us This is not a book so it s my own darn fault for placing expectations of coherency on it I did like when he spoke about some of my favorite artists Degas, Monet there was a great story about Manet from the days before Gauguin had left stockbroking for art Manet praised one of his paintings, to which he said he was only an amateur Manet replied, th [...]



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