Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness For decades Western psychology has promised fulfillment through building and strengthening the ego We are taught that the ideal is a strong individuated self constructed and reinforced over a lifet
  • Title: Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness
  • Author: Mark Epstein Charlie Conrad
  • ISBN: 9780767902359
  • Page: 316
  • Format: Paperback
  • Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness
    For decades, Western psychology has promised fulfillment through building and strengthening the ego We are taught that the ideal is a strong, individuated self, constructed and reinforced over a lifetime But Buddhist psychiatrist Mark Epstein has found a different way Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart shows us that happiness doesn t come from any kind of acquisitiveFor decades, Western psychology has promised fulfillment through building and strengthening the ego We are taught that the ideal is a strong, individuated self, constructed and reinforced over a lifetime But Buddhist psychiatrist Mark Epstein has found a different way Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart shows us that happiness doesn t come from any kind of acquisitiveness, be it material or psychological Happiness comes from letting go Weaving together the accumulated wisdom of his two worlds Buddhism and Western psychotherapy Epstein shows how the happiness that we seek depends on our ability to balance the ego s need to do with our inherent capacity to be He encourages us to relax the ever vigilant mind in order to experience the freedom that comes only from relinquishing control Drawing on events in his own life and stories from his patients, Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart teaches us that only by letting go can we start on the path to a peaceful and spiritually satisfying life.About The Author Mark Epstein, M.D is a psychiatrist in private practice and the author of Thoughts Without a Thinker He is a contributing editor to Tricycle The Buddhist Review and clinical assistant professor of psychology at New York University He lives in New York City.
    Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness By Mark Epstein Charlie Conrad,
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  • Mark Epstein Charlie Conrad

    Mark Epstein Charlie Conrad Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness book, this is one of the most wanted Mark Epstein Charlie Conrad author readers around the world.

  • 999 Comments

  • It s not an exaggeration to say this book changed my life It got me to consider meditation, something I d always considered uniquely odious, but now believe has made me 10% happier Also, I ve become friends with Mark, and he s a gem.


  • This book was not what I was expecting it to be Dan Harris, of Good Morning America, said this book literally changed his life While I didn t find it life changing in any way, nor what I was looking for a book about how to quiet the mind in this crazy world we are living in and live with less stress it was a good book about incorporating mindfulness into psychotherapyif one is interested in that There are far better books out there on mindfulness and meditation, in my opinion.


  • If we are not our thoughts, then what are we Dr Epstein explores the productiveness of coming to terms with ourselves and our defenses pain through psychotherapy and or through Buddhist meditation practice He goes into the ways both practices complement each other and how being stuck in one method can lead to a breakthrough in the other He also mentions several types of meditation from sitting still and staring at a blank wall to sexual meditations, indicating that orgasms in respectful relation [...]


  • Good grief This was the book I needed to read If nothing else, it s given me a little bit of peace with the whole meditation process this is the first book that has mentioned how difficult it can be to finally face all the mental chatter I ve been meditating daily for about a month and a half, and in some ways I feel betterbut let s just say that taming my mind and dealing with the emotions that have surfaced has proven to be difficult, yikes But I really love the main message of this book which [...]


  • This book was PROFOUNDLY insightful to me It is a case by case look at how a Buddhist perspective can aid in psychological healing It s been a while, but I did read it twice I d have to look at my notes in the margins to give a better, in depth review of this book However, I can offer some clue by telling you what I got most out of this book and what I will ultimately take from it Dr Epstein did a marvelous job of putting Buddhist principles and concepts in context, making the religion far less [...]


  • Read this after reading Dan Harris 10% Happier and while I do think there is a lot of good stuff in Mark Epstein s book, reading it right after Harris s may have been overkill For one, 10% Happier is written in a much accessible style Epstein s book is very much a psychology book and a Buddhist book, and if you don t have a good grounding in both, you may get a little lost or lose interest Plus, a lot of the same ideas are hit upon, but Mark describes them a little abstractly A little practic [...]


  • Good concepts I m no longer that impressed by books on Buddhism written by well off,white, abled bodied, males.


  • My favorite part of this book came before page 1 In the introduction, Dr Epstein cites a Buddhist story of a university professor who goes to a Zen master eager to learn The master offers him tea and then pours the tea into the cup until it overflows, and when the professor complains, the Zen master continues to pour and explains, A mind that is already full cannot take in anything new The snippits of Zen tradition, Buddhist koans, and other pieces of Eastern philosophy that make their way into [...]


  • Something is wrong with this book While there are the occasional insights, the author comes across as too worshipful of others not respectful of himself There are odd moments where he defers to the wisdom of others at times when it s not at all necessary The book is very dry, cerebral, detached That seems to be something Buddhists strive for and it makes me want to punch them I don t have feelings, I merely observe them They don t control me Don t feel this POW Something about this observing det [...]


  • This is a reflection on how Buddhism and traditional psychotherapy conflict in some ways, but compliment each other as well Epstein is not writing a self help book, although there is much in the work that is edifying Instead, he is weaving together strands of meditation and therapy to address issues of wholeness and emptiness As a result, the work is somewhat dense although Epstein is very good at using stories to make his points, there s a lot of psychiatric theory and Buddhist history to work [...]


  • Although small in size, Epstein s book presents quite a powerful synthesis of Buddhism and psychotherapy Amazingly, he brings clarity to the paradoxical concepts of feeling whole by accepting emptiness finding happiness by letting go feeling at peace by tolerating uncertainty and being able to go to pieces in order to avoid falling apart I ve already read this book twice, and I have no doubt that each successive read will uncover gems hidden inside The writing is superb, the presentation is co [...]


  • I struggled through this book I read a book a while back where someone was a Buddhist and he talked about meditation So I picked this up thinking I could learn something But the author clearly has a vocabulary far different from mine It was hard to follow along If you are familiar with Buddhism and are an MD and have the vocab down, then this book might mean something to you and you might be able to extract some useful information I, unfortunately, lacked the key to unlock this book.


  • I enjoyed this book because it made me think critically about the concepts of self and happiness in modern day psychology at first But then I realized a lot of the examples of where Buddhism succeeds and psychology fails are really just examples of either bad psychology or dated philosophy I m biased because I study psychology, but I really didn t find anything in the principles of Buddhism mentioned that were strikingly different from therapies I ve learned about Acceptance mindfulness based th [...]


  • Going to Pieces is very much in the self help mode Epstein mixes case histories from his psychiatry practice, his own stories, psychotherapy theories and Buddhist texts His other books are fluid and go deeper But this is still an insightful guide to bringing Buddhists practices to bear on your daily life.


  • I first read this book when it came out, and just finished rereading it 15 years later It is still an insightful and relevant book today as it was then This is not a practitioners guide to Buddhism, nor is it an introduction Epstein grapples with the concept of emptiness as examined through the lens of western contemporary psychotherapy and Buddhism What follows is his attempt to inform the limited concept of emptiness in the western tradition with its expansive and freeing interpretation from [...]


  • Like Freud s friends, who shrunk back from the terrifying transitoriness of the flower s bloom, and like Joe, we recoil from the revelation of our lover s freedom We insist on holding on, or we withdraw prematurely, rather than trusting in love s ability to constantly reassert itself Yet this is precisely what makes a relationship as much of a spiritual teaching as a classical meditation Both confront us with our refusal to let go, with our expectations for how things are supposed to be Both dem [...]


  • With Thoughts Without a Thinker I needed to break up the reading because the ideas were so intense However, in Going to Pieces I would have preferred to have read it through in just a sitting or two It is an easier read with easier concepts, so it would have been enjoyable to have really immersed myself into the material It is a book to re read several times, so next time I ll probably read it without the outside interruptions I had this time Mark Epstein definitely didn t disappoint and reading [...]


  • One of the few books I gave up on I just wasn t connecting with it In spite of it connecting therapy and Buddhism, two very interesting and fascinating subjects Maybe it was because I just didn t feel like it brought me any new insights, because it didn t move me, emotionally or mentally And because I have a stack of other books waiting for me, so I chose not to waste any time, but to just move on.


  • Ok ish.I was looking for a good perspective on buddhist psychology, but didn t find much insight here.Concerning the Buddhist part, Epstein just covers the basics as so many books do Regarding the psychological part, a broader perspecive would have been nive, Epstein leans too much on Winnicot for my liking It became harder and harder to finish this book, which looked so promising at first.


  • I spent a lot of time identifying with what Epstein had to say here, and I think it s interesting to see how contemplative practices can offer insights and peace that can round out what we re looking for in therapy it s a good amt of pulling the wool away and looking at how westerners have been socially indoctrinated.


  • Not overly dense or overly simplistic this books walks a fine line of being insightful and accessible Those looking for a scientific approach may be disappointed by the lack of studies or brain imaging references but if you are happy to learn from the wisdom and analytic skill of someone with years of experience in the contemplative fields of Buddhism and psychotherapy you are in for a treat.


  • There are some gems in this book that make it worth reading, some aha moments I could relate back to my own life, but I would have preferred a condensed version containing only these gems by my definition Is asking an author to write the book for me asking too much




  • I first bought this book over 10 years ago and I re read it every couple of years It has gotten me through a lot of difficult times I highly recommend.




  • There is a difference between accumulating knowledge and discovering wisdom Wisdom emerges in the space around words, as much as from language itself 3.5 stars for Epstein s hybrid psychotherapy Buddhist meditation guide I appreciated many of the anecdotes and the stories of work with different patients, though I found some of the topics and stories straying from the original thesis of the book It s a book particularly suited for beginners or those wanting to return to fundamentals of meditation [...]


  • It is no coincidence that a society that values self promotion and advancing at whatever cost is full of anxious and depressed people Epstein s fundamental premise, that the Western and perhaps, above all, the American quest for a strong, defined, confident identity leads to an unquiet mind so lost in thought that we become isolated from people and experience, is radical and liberating In fact, surrendering our egos and quieting our constantly thinking minds can lead to closer relationships and [...]


  • My latest reading related to my current delve int0 the rabbit hole on the subjects of Buddhism, mindfulness, and meditation Mostly an exploration of the area of crossover between Buddhism and psychotherapy, this book offered plenty of interesting and practical insights The stories about his patients might not all connect with everyone, but when you run across one of them that does, it s powerful stuff.Epstein s writing is measured, reasonable, and largely scientific in its approach It read well [...]


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