Trouble with Lichen

Trouble with Lichen Francis Saxover and Diana Brackley two scientists investigating a rare lichen discover it has a remarkable property it retards the aging process Francis realising the implications for the world of
  • Title: Trouble with Lichen
  • Author: John Wyndham
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 360
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Trouble with Lichen
    Francis Saxover and Diana Brackley, two scientists investigating a rare lichen, discover it has a remarkable property it retards the aging process Francis, realising the implications for the world of an ever youthful, wealthy elite, wants to keep it secret, but Diana sees an opportunity to overturn the male status quo by using the lichen to inspire a feminist revolution.Francis Saxover and Diana Brackley, two scientists investigating a rare lichen, discover it has a remarkable property it retards the aging process Francis, realising the implications for the world of an ever youthful, wealthy elite, wants to keep it secret, but Diana sees an opportunity to overturn the male status quo by using the lichen to inspire a feminist revolution.As each scientist wrestles with the implications and practicalities of exploiting the discovery, the world comes ever closer to learning the truth Trouble With Lichen is a scintillating story of the power wielded by science in our lives and asks how much trust should we place in those we appoint to be its guardians
    Trouble with Lichen By John Wyndham,
    • [AZW] ☆ Trouble with Lichen | BY ☆ John Wyndham
      360 John Wyndham
    • thumbnail Title: [AZW] ☆ Trouble with Lichen | BY ☆ John Wyndham
      Posted by:John Wyndham
      Published :2019-02-21T17:12:59+00:00

    About " John Wyndham "

  • John Wyndham

    John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris was the son of a barrister After trying a number of careers, including farming, law, commercial art and advertising, he started writing short stories in 1925 After serving in the civil Service and the Army during the war, he went back to writing Adopting the name John Wyndham, he started writing a form of science fiction that he called logical fantasy As well as The Day of the Triffids, he wrote The Kraken Wakes, The Chrysalids, The Midwich Cuckoos filmed as Village of the Damned and The Seeds of Time.

  • 975 Comments


  • Trouble with Lichen didn t strike me as quite as readable as Wyndham s other books, but the prominence of female characters concerns was a welcome surprise The plot is a bit different to Wyndham s other books, too You might be excused, knowing Wyndham s other books, for thinking that this is a book about lichen taking over the world, but this isn t one of his post apocalyptic efforts.If you ve enjoyed Wyndham s other stuff, this is a bit different, but equally enjoyable, I think The science isn [...]


  • 3.5I m fast becoming a fan of Wyndham s works This is a lot thought provoking than Day of the Triffids, though I will confess to enjoying it far less Though it comes across a little preachy at times, Trouble With Lichens is nonetheless interesting, funny at times , relevant and thought provoking, and I can honestly confess that I did not see that end coming.


  • This book was written by the guy who wrote Day of the Triffids, and we should all know what I think of that book by now it s awesome to the power eleventy billion I was expecting something along similar lines an out of control plant species runs amok, humanity is threatened, and we are forced to face the moral questions that come along with fighting for survival in an increasingly cruel world.That s not what Trouble With Lichen is about at all, though I did keep imagining this silent creep of gr [...]


  • I read several Wyndham novels when I was 12 or 13 this was one of them My recollection of those novels was that they were enjoyable but tended to have poor endings, as if Wyndham had said what he wanted, got bored and just stopped The exception was The Day of the Triffids which had a satisfactory ending So how would I respond to re reading Trouble with Lichen First I found it a good deal sophisticated than memory had led me to believe The book is a feminist tract, following the career of a stro [...]


  • When I first saw the title of this book, I thought it would be about how lichen would somehow become a danger to mankind, pose a threat that might wipe us all out But it s not like that at all Rather lichen offers mankind the solution to one of it s oldest problems, but the two people who discover it fear the social ramifications of it getting out.I m not even going to talk about the nature of the benefits this lichen offers to mankind because it s not revealed until about 25% of the way through [...]



  • This John Wyndham book, did not really contain anything that made me feel awesome or even great or wonderful, for that matter , and as a result after loving his books like The Day of the Triffids, The Chrysalids and The Midwich Cuckoos, having read through the years, this one was very much near to boring, and even skippable I should say, much like how Chocky was just prior to this about four years ago In fact Chocky was slightly better than this However, still, the idea of not ageing, being the [...]


  • Published in 1960, John Wyndham s Trouble with Lichen tells the story of Diana Brackley, a revolutionary, a feminist, and a scientist.Diana is considered odd because although she is attractive, she does not want to marry Instead, she is dedicated to her career in the lab, and it is there that she makes her amazing discovery a type of lichen that slows the aging process Diana decides to use the lichen to empower women, and she sets up a beauty clinic that caters to rich and influential women oft [...]


  • This was AMAZING I love John Wyndham, but my problem with him was that his books always came across as sexist and racist Though this book is still massively problematic in Wyndham s understanding of feminism, it s at least an understanding and frankly it s a pretty good one He seems to have a good understanding of the binary between the public and domestic spheres and how that works in gender, and frankly, it was just well written and exciting My new dream is to find a lichen that starts a femin [...]


  • Read this 13 years ago, only fiished it due to lack of alternative reading material Disliked it enough that it stuck in my memory, although details are fuzzy Didn t realize it was the same author as Day of the Triffids.


  • This book is unusual and intriguing Much essay esque than the rest of Wyndham s stuff, and perhaps that s contributed to it s comparable lack of popularity On the other hand, this is an unusually feminist concept and execution from a white male in the 50s Especially one who, as far as my limited research has found, wasn t particularly know for his feminist leanings.Could this have effected the book s readership Possibly And for feminism it s a highly questionable form of it Though the movement [...]


  • Curious little tale from Mr Wyndham Published in 1960, and sadly some of the social issues that come up in this book are still as relevant, if not , 55 years on I wouldn t say this is his best novel, in fact it felt very slow and meandering to start, and in someways is slow moving, told through people having conversations And yet when it does get going, it is engaging.This is the story of some Chinese lichen, that has the bizarre property of really slowing down the ageing process To the point wh [...]


  • Who wants to live forever Freddie Mercury once asked, well it turns out John Wyndham asked the same question years earlier, and the answer isn t what you expect.Of course the knee jerk position is to say Yes, of course I want to live for 200 years as the rare form of lichen discovered in this book would allow you to do , but Wyndham takes the opposite view When I gathered what the gist of this book was going to be, I assumed the rest of the narrative would be concerned with various governments a [...]


  • Francis Saxover and Diana Brackley, two scientists investigating a rare lichen, discover it has a remarkable property it retards the aging process Francis, realising the implications for the world of an ever youthful, wealthy elite, wants to keep it secret, but Diana sees an opportunity to overturn the male status quo by using the lichen to inspire a feminist revolution As each scientist wrestles with the implications and practicalities of exploiting the discovery, the world comes ever closer to [...]


  • More like a 3.5, but I have bumped it up simply for my love of Wyndham A very interesting look into the huge responsibility that comes with scientific discovery.


  • Book club choice for February from Sue, and it s taking us back a few years, published in 1960 I thoroughly enjoyed this book, a certain feminist edge to it, and sci fi but not space sci fi, short and set in the UK, ticked plenty of boxes My one and only criticism, a pretty abrupt ending, and I want to know what happens next


  • By 1960, British sci fi author John Wyndham was popularly known as the creator of what Brian W Aldiss would later call cosy catastrophes, largely by dint of a quartet of highly successful novels from the previous decade The Day of the Triffids 51 had dealt with walking, malevolent plants and a world gone blind following a meteor storm The Kraken Wakes 53 had told of an alien invasion from the oceanic depths The Chrysalids 55 had described a postapocalyptic world, and the puritanical society that [...]


  • 3.5 starsRereading some old favorites This is one that I come back to less often than others The Day of the Triffids, The Kraken Wakes but still find new points to enjoy nonetheless It s different from most of his others, being concerned with potential actual societal change and the philosophical musings around what would happen if we could live 200 years.There s a preponderance of strong female characters not entirely unusual for Wyndham, but they almost entirely dominate, making a nice change [...]


  • This was a quick read, breezily satirical and crisply written, with a charming heroine and an interesting hypothesis What would happen if a lichen could be found and processed to create a potion that could slow the rate of human s growth and extend people s lives Like all Whyndam s novels, the interesting prediction of the future is eerily accurate in the foretelling of the problems that will come with progress Written in 1960, the book is relevant today in its discussion of the implications of [...]


  • Not the best known of Wyndham s books the Triffids offer stiff competition and one I d overlooked It s of its time, a time before genetic engineering was dreamt of, and yet curiously relevant to our own age of obsession with self image and eternal youth It explores the questions that will always attend new technologies who benefits, are they being misused, should they be reserved for the elite and has a good dig at the hysteria of the popular presses along the way The heroine is curiously distan [...]


  • I enjoyed the fast pace of this book, which followed the evolution of a female scientist and her male counterparts facing a moral dilemma with a new biological discovery I felt that the character development was a bit shoddy The author also uses different characters to move the story along and it left me wanting to know about those characters than what was provided In general it seemed to have a short story feel It was a very quick read, I finished it in about 4 hours Even so, I thought it was [...]


  • It s the 50s, and she tells people she s going to be a scientist She meets with a variety of negative reactions, including Huh , Why would a pretty girl like you want to do that and You ll grow out of it when you meet the right man But the one that really annoys her, and which they keep saying behind her back, is What does it matter, as long as she s happy She grits her teeth and decides she ll damn well show them And she does.


  • A book with good intentions and good ideas that has not aged well Not helped by the fact that it mainly features characters explaining events to each other rather than experiencing them, nor by substantial sections showing weird attitudes to the lower classes Clearly sets out to be feminist and maybe was in the 50s, but that is the part that s aged worst The best ideas are wasted and the whole is quite dull.


  • It is nice to explore the ethics morals of scientific discovery, both the discovery process itself and the potential impact such a discovery would have on society and the environment The book is paced quite well, and I finished it in one sitting.



  • Very naive and modest writing, maybe this isn t one of John Wyndham best works, but the man who wrote like that even once i can t expect any thing from him.


  • Here I am, then, seven books into Penguin s sexily reissued novels by John Wyndham And yet, seven books in, he still surprises and delights me with his work The rascal.The first Wyndham novel I read, not coincidentally seven years ago, was The Day of the Triffids That book may be better known than my most recent consumption Trouble with Lichen, but the two works do have some surprising parallels Both have plants lurking ever present in the background as the story s ostensible focus, but make no [...]


  • I d forgotten a lot of this book since reading it first in high school It resonates strongly today with the crisis our world is facing, part of which population growth and feeding all the people of the world was obviously seen by the author all the way back in the early 60 s The underlying idea of the book is that the world is stuffed because people don t live long enough to lead anything but self centred lives, not considering future generations, women rushing happily into marriage knowing that [...]


  • I love science fiction particularly mid century short stories and novellas, so I was excited to dive into this one headfirst Gender power structures and biochemical discoveries I was ready to fall in love I m not being facetious Then I started this one, and everything went off the rails To begin, the pacing was a lot slower than I expected Yes, modern media has conditioned us to consume only insta action page turners, but this felt slow even by standards of earlier literature This novella defini [...]


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